ALEKS - Assessment and Learning

Higher Education

Access Code

How do I purchase an ALEKS Student Access Code?
Where is my ALEKS Student Access Code?

Assessments

When I request or schedule an assessment for my class, I have a choice between "Comprehensive" and "Progress" assessment. What is the difference?
What is a "goal completion" assessment?

Learning Mode

How should my students use explanations in ALEKS?

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Check your syllabus for instructions on how to access ALEKS. If ALEKS is bundled with your textbook or is available as a stand-alone purchase through the bookstore, the 20-character ALEKS Student Access Code will be inside the ALEKS User Guide.

If your instructor has directed you to purchase ALEKS directly online through eCommerce, then please select one of the following to purchase your ALEKS Student Access Code. 

I'm purchasing an ALEKS Student Access Code for access to: 

ALEKS Math, Statistics, Business Math, or Business Statistics

ALEKS Accounting

ALEKS Chemistry

ALEKS Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

If you purchased an ALEKS User Guide bundled with your course textbook or as a stand-alone from the bookstore, then the 20-character Student Access Code can be found inside your ALEKS User Guide.

If your instructor has directed you to purchase ALEKS directly online through eCommerce, then please select one of the following to purchase your ALEKS Student Access Code. 

I'm purchasing an ALEKS Student Access Code for access to: 

ALEKS Math, Statistics, Business Math, or Business Statistics

ALEKS Accounting

ALEKS Chemistry

ALEKS Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

There are two types of assessment in ALEKS. Please note that both types of assessment produce results that show your students' knowledge relative to the entire course contents. They differ, however, in the questioning strategy. A "progress" assessment tends to focus on the student's recent learning history. It is slightly shorter than a "comprehensive" assessment, and is intended mainly to check the students' retention of material recently learned. A "comprehensive" assessment ranges more broadly over the content of the course. It is slightly longer than a "progress" assessment, and is intended to check the students' knowledge or retention of material throughout the course. A "comprehensive" assessment is appropriate, for example, to use as a final exam or practice final.

A goal completion assessment is triggered automatically in ALEKS the first time that a student reaches 100% mastery in the Learning Mode (that is, fills in her or his pie chart completely). Often, the student will score less than 100% on the goal completion assessment; when this happens, the student can fill in her pie chart again and, in this way, gain additional reinforcement on the most advanced topics of the course. The second time that the student fills in the pie chart, there will not be a goal completion assessment; if additional assessments are desired, they can be assigned by the instructor.

Explanations in ALEKS are different from what you will find in most textbooks, because they are always the step-by-step solutions of specific problems. ALEKS Explanations are designed for use when the student is working on a particular problem and gets stuck, or makes a mistake and doesn't know what it is. When the student refers to an ALEKS Explanation for help with a problem, the student can quickly compare it with the steps she followed to locate the mistake or misunderstanding. Then, the student will go back and try again with a new problem and a better understanding of the method used to solve it. Note that ALEKS is focused on **active** learning. It is not necessary for students to read the explanations before beginning to work on problems for a new topic; students can do that if they prefer, but most of the time they will know enough about the new topic to attempt it right away, and then go to the explanation for support and help as needed. Please note as well that the explanations contain links to the definition of key terms, and sometimes "Quick Notes" expanding on the more interesting or important steps in the solution of the problem.